The Animal Welfare Bill 2007

In ENGLAND from the 6th April 2007 the new animal welfare takes affect, this bill does not deal with some of the most important issues:

 

It still allows local authorities to issue Pet shops with a Licenses to sell Puppies from there premises!!! ( SHOPS ), puppies need the right environment and love before being placed in there new home, how a puppy can get the rest and correct socialization as well as being keep free of infection from other animals is beyond reason.

 

It does not do enough to outlaw puppy farming.

 

It bans people who show there dogs where the public is paying an entrance fee, which may leave a lope hole for some unscrupulous breeder to still dock.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It does not demand that all puppies are registered at birth and chipped to show ownership, dogs homes would not be full of stray and unwanted dogs if people and breeders could be hold reasonable for them.

 

4514878280.gif
4515753433.gif
4515753439.gif
4515753439.gif

DROWNING PUPPIES 'WASN'T CRUEL'

A MAN who drowned seven Staffordshire Bull Terrier puppies because they got on his nerves has been cleared of cruelty.

 

Experts were unable to prove they suffered more than if they had been put to sleep by a vet.

 

John Wooligan, 47, of Whitehaven, Cumbria, said he decided to kill the ten-day-old dogs because their ‘yapping’ got on his nerves after their mother rejected them.

 

He dropped them in a water-filled plastic box in his bath, and put a second box on top of it to prevent them getting out. He buried them in his garden.

 

He declined to give evidence at Whitehaven Magistrates’ Court last week, but acknowledged the killings during an interview with the RSPCA.

 

They were yapping all day long,” he told the charity’s inspectors. “I couldn’t cope with seven puppies.”

Keith Thomas, prosecuting, said the act of drowning the puppies had caused them unnecessary suffering.

 

But David Roberts, defending, said there was no evidence that such young puppies could experience pain.

 

His view was supported by Steven Lomax, a vet with 28 years’ experience, who told the court: “I have heard no evidence that the drowning of a puppy is inhumane.

 

The magistrates agreed, but stressed: “We are not making any general finding that the drowning of puppies is an acceptable practice